The Jekyll & Hyde & Various Sides of Writer Joy Lanzendorfer

To start the New Year of 2018 off with a BANG, if you’re looking for a dynamic writer you may not have encountered yet, look no further, for Joy Lanzendorfer is here! From short stories to blogging, photography to non-fiction articles, she shares her writing experiences with us here at The Navi Review. Oh, and don’t worry – she’s no Mr. Hyde, but you’ll love reading about her interest and experience with it!

Question # 1

You have written dozens of freelance articles for publications such as Mental Floss and The Atlantic, including many “facts you didn’t know about____” pieces. Where do you come up with the ideas for these pieces, and how do you know all of these fun facts?

I get ideas by noticing connections and asking questions. I find that when you follow your curiosity, one thing leads to another, and you end up making discoveries. For example, I became interested in Robert Louis Stevenson’s time in Napa, near where I live, because he honeymooned on a mountain that I’ve hiked before. In researching that, I learned that he stayed in a hotel in Monterey that still exists, so of course I had to visit that too. While there, I learned that he got the idea for Treasure Island from Monterey—while there, someone found Spanish coins on a beach and people speculated that pirates had put them there. I also learned how sick Stevenson was while in Monterey, and I started wondering how a man who died at age 44 from tuberculosis managed to accomplish so much in his life—he traveled much of the world and wrote a bunch of best-selling fiction. And THAT led to the discovery that he likely wrote Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde while on a cocaine binge. He was prescribed the drug and then wrote the novel in just a few days after he started taking it. Naturally I had to share all this with Mental Floss, which I did in my article 11 Strange Facts About Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (http://mentalfloss.com/article/67769/11-strange-facts-about-dr-jekyll-and-mr-hyde). So that’s an example of how I get ideas. Lots of curiosity, lots of research.

 

Question #2

You maintain a blog at www.ohjoy.org where you post everything from short stories to vacation photos to articles you’ve written for various publications. How has blogging helped you in your writing career, and what drives you to continue blogging?

It’s funny because I made my first website in 1996, and I’ve been online in some way since then, but it hasn’t helped my career at all until recently. I think the difference comes from building up social media, which I started doing about three years ago. Having more of a Twitter presence means that if followers are curious about me or read something I wrote, they’re more likely to go to the blog to see who I am. Sometimes that means they’ll reach out to me professionally. When I put up that I was looking for a literary agent, several agents saw it and emailed me, which never would have happened before I was on Twitter. I don’t think writers have to blog, but I do think it’s smart to have some kind of site with your bio and contact information. These days, people want to see who you are online.

Question # 3 

That would be “You’re A Good Man, Andy Hardy,” which was published in Hotel Amerika, and unfortunately isn’t online. It’s about the Andy Hardy movies of the 1930s, which starred Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland. The story is from the point of view of Betsy Booth, Judy Garland’s character, and it deals with gender inequality and traditional American ideas of what makes people “good” and “bad.” It’s the closest I’ve come to writing in the creative mode I’d ideally like to stay in, which is somewhat surreal and lyrical while still humorous. And the story gave me no hassle and came together easily, which makes me like it more.

Question #4

You seem to have a real passion for photography. Your blog features everything from nature photos to candid shots in everyday life. How did you develop your passion for photography, and how does this impact your writing?

Good question. I’ve never thought about this before. The short answer is that I’m just a creative person and I’m always making or recording or expressing something in some way. I cook and garden and sew and knit and all kinds of crap like that. I also come from a creative family. My grandfather was a photographer, my mom’s a painter, and my dad builds things out of wood, so it’s no surprise that I’m a visual thinker. Photography allows me to express my experience of a situation visually, and I like to share that experience with others. (My mom also makes oil paintings from the pictures I take, so I do a lot of it for her.) As for my writing, it’s useful to have a visual record of things I’ve experienced because I might want to describe something from it in the future.

 

Question #5

You’ve written and interviewed extensively on “The Rise of Plagiarism in Self-Publishing.” For those who haven’t read your work on this (which can be found at www.ohjoy.org), what circumstance have you personally encountered that has made you such a passionate voice about this?

I don’t think anything I’ve written has been plagiarized, although who knows? I’ve never looked. But I can’t imagine anything worse than someone taking your work and passing it off as their own, especially if it’s your creative writing. This may make me seem petty, but in school I hated when people copied me. I really couldn’t stand it if I did something original and someone else started doing it too. So I empathized with the writers in that article, especially since they had so little recourse for protecting their work.

 

Question #6

In your flash fiction such as “Murmur” and “Drought,” you pack social commentary into short reading doses. Do you find that it’s easier or more difficult to make an impact with flash fiction than with longer short stories or full-length fiction? What is your preferred medium of writing, and why?

I prefer novels. With novels, you have room to build worlds and develop characters, and the reader is more likely to go along with you. I think full-length short stories are the hardest things to write, period. They’re very finicky. They work best when the ending resonates, which means that writing them is a matter of setting out the exact components of a story—no more, no less—that lead to an earned ending that somehow equals all that came before. That’s hard to get right and it’s easy to think a short story is done when it’s not. Short-shorts are easier for me. They have to shift in some way to be a “story,” but that shift can be interpreted many ways, which means they’re more experimental. I like to experiment.

 

Question #7

What forms of writing have you not yet experimented with, and would you like to ever try writing in those forms? What makes those forms so different from the writing you do now?

I’m interested in playwriting. When I was in high school, I would go to the library, get out stacks of plays, and then read them, one after another. Because of this, the structure of a play is burned in my brain. I still read plays and keep up with current playwrights. Writing in all dialogue would come naturally to me, so maybe I’ll give it a try some day.

 

Question #8

Which of your stories is the first short story you ever had published in a literary magazine, and what was that experience like?

It was in college. It was a short story for a magazine called Straight Up!, or something silly like that. The story had to do with a glass swan, if I remember correctly. I probably have a copy up in the attic. It was a big deal to me because they paid me $80 for the story, which was the first time I was paid for something I wrote. At the time, I was debating whether or not to be a writer, and that story pushed me over toward writing, for better or worse.

 

Question #9

What is the strangest compliment you’ve ever received regarding your writing?

At a party recently, I ran into someone who was at a reading I gave 7-8 years ago. The story I read was about a creepy stalker with a glove fetish. Apparently my story freaked out this woman so much that she can’t look at gloves without thinking about it. She said I changed how she looks at gloves. Imagine that! It was one of the nicest compliments I’ve ever received.

 

Question #10

Tell us one awkward/embarrassing/unique fact about yourself.

 

I asked my friend what I should say here, and she reminded me of the weird things I do to myself when I’m writing. I’ll wrap myself in multiple blankets so not the slightest shift in air temperature can penetrate my skin, then I’ll put giant headphones on to block out noise, and then, if the light is bothering me, I’ll slap a sunhat on top of my head. I’ll look like a mummy with a crumpled sunhat on its head. It’s the most unsexy, silly way to write, but it helps me concentrate when I’m not distracted by bodily discomfort. It’s like putting blinders on a horse so it can concentrate on walking down the street.

 

Where the Tables Turn: Feel free to ask me any question you’d like for me to answer for my readers, and/or pose a question to your readers or the general public! 

 

What’s your favorite writing prompt? I like looking at the Post Secrets site for inspiration. (https://postsecret.com/)

 

To answer Joy’s question (readers, feel free to jump in and respond as well!) I tend to prefer prompts that push me outside of my comfort zone but not so far as to go completely to left field. For example, I love the prompt “Write about somebody who is COMPLETELY unlike yourself.” That’s how my short story “Kid Gloves” was written, from a prompt I was given years ago. However, if I was given a prompt like “Write about a Martian living on Mars” I’d be at a complete loss!

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