Magic Meets Humanity, Resilience Meets Reality – Chloe Benjamin Tackles the Ultimate Life Question: How We Handle Mortality

Chloe Benjamin’s magically poignant new novel, The Immortalists, hits the shelves everywhere January 2018! The rising new literary star stopped in at The Navi Review to discuss all things bookish and — dare I say it? — existentialist. Read here as the author we’d all love to know, of the novel we can’t wait to snag, leaves a little piece of herself here for her readers.

 

Question # 1

You’ve described your life in eight words as: “Lakes, books, coffee, crafting, friends, stories, quiet, home.” Can you describe for us a typical day in your life, and how your writing and writing success has changed (or not changed) that eight-word formula for you?

I’m very impressed you found that S&S questionnaire! Happily, a typical day in my life hasn’t changed very much, although I’m now a full time writer (while I wrote my first book, I worked in social services). I live in Madison, WI, where I did my MFA, which is far from the publishing epicenter in New York City. While I used to worry I might miss opportunities by being so far away, I’ve realized that having a quieter, more removed life is a good fit for me. I love to fly into New York, but it’s better for my work to have a few degrees of separation from the hubbub and pressure. Most days, I try to write from 9am to 12 or 1pm and use afternoons for emails, media and other business-y things. Working out, going to yoga, spending cozy evenings with friends, and knitting (a lot!) keep me balanced.

 

Question #2

Your debut novel, The Anatomy of Dreams, explores similar themes as The Immortalists. Going by a description comparable in its probing questions—“Human beings are more productive than ever before, but they’re also unhappier. They feel oppressed by the limits of their lives: the boredom, the repetition, the fatigue. What if you could use your sleep to do more—to receive all of the traditional regenerative benefits while problem-solving, healing, even experiencing alternate worlds? Wouldn’t you be capable of extraordinary things?” –your novels explore the idea of “what if” and the oppression that life’s limits press upon us. What do you want to say the loudest as you explore these themes; what do you want to ensure that your readers get out of these novels once they’ve turned that final page?

I’m drawn to big, existential questions: the tension between life’s limits and possibilities, the tension between knowledge and uncertainty, and so on. I think we all cope with these curiosities, to some degree, so I hope that my novels offer readers the chance to sit with and explore them. With The Immortalists in particular, and its focus on mortality, I hope it offers solace and companionship for those who also struggle with uncertainty, anxiety and loss—as well as the question of how to live fully.

 

Question #3

The world you created in The Immortalists is so complete, from the description of magic tricks to the inner workings of experimental science, it’s obvious that you did a lot of research to get the details just right. What can you tell us about your research process for this novel? 

Both of my novels have taken quite a bit of research, but The Immortalists definitely takes the cake! Each of its four sections required a deep dive into a different character, time period, profession and subculture, from the Castro’s early gay community to the world of professional magicians. To keep myself from becoming overwhelmed, I focused on these sections one at a time, though I sometimes had to jump forward and research the next character because of their role in the previous character’s section (for instance, I had to understand Klara’s passion for magic while writing the preceding section, Simon’s). My research process included a wide variety of materials, from nonfiction and memoirs to documentaries, archival footage, interviews and travel.

 

Question #4

In The Immortalists, magic plays a big factor in the story line and becomes a metaphor throughout, which becomes the novel’s namesake. What is your own personal experience with magic, and how did you know it was the perfect fit for Klara?

I didn’t have any experience with the world of magic prior to writing the book, but like Klara, I do have a curiosity about the edges of reality—or, put differently, how much of reality seems inexplicable, how it can be mindbogglingly strange and hard to pin down. When I thought of the name for Klara’s act, I knew it was the perfect title for the novel, as all of the characters chafe against mortality in different ways. I see religion, science and magic—all belief systems that offer ways of coping with these questions—as more related than they might seem on the surface.

 

Question #5

Readers who know and follow you will be able to tell that you put a lot of yourself into The Immortalists, such as your love of science and medicine and your personal experience with both San Francisco and New York, where you went to school. What other nuggets of yourself or your past can be found within the pages of this novel?

I grew up with San Francisco and gay parents, and I was a ballet dancer for about fifteen years—so even though I’m not a gay man, I probably share the most DNA with Simon’s section. On the other hand, I identify with Klara’s passion and ambition, and with Varya’s tendency toward anxiety and control. I’m probably least similar to Daniel, though I have a soft spot for him, and his section is set near Poughkeepsie, NY, where I went to college.

 

Question #6

As an MFA holder and writing instructor, I’m sure you’ve run across so many different forms and genres of writing. What forms or genres of writing have you not yet experimented with yourself, and would you like to ever try writing in those forms? What makes those so different from the writing you do now?

I think of my writing as being pretty traditional literary fiction: character-driven, with an attention to language—though I love a good story and am always trying to improve my use of plot! There’s a bit of a speculative or magical realist element to my work, and I admire writers who write more fully within those traditions. I’m fascinated by outer space and have a wild dream of writing a novel set on a space station, but I have no experience writing sci-fi and the research for that kind of project feels even more intimidating than what I did for The Immortalists!

 

Question #7

Which of your short stories or review articles (previously or soon-to-be published) was the hardest to write or conceptualize, and what was that experience like for you?

The hardest one to write was one that hasn’t yet been published, as I’ve been keeping it under my hat until I feel brave enough to share it. It’s about my own history of anxiety, especially as it relates to loss and the body.

 

Question #8

What is the strangest compliment you’ve ever received regarding your writing, whether in school or since being published?

Ooh, strangest? I once got a three-star review that said something like, “Was gonna be a two; got a little better.”

 

Question #9

The road from drafting a novel on your laptop to having it published by a major publisher can be just as long and grueling a process as it is exciting and self-verifying. What is your most memorable experience with your editorial team thus far? Have there been any situations where you do did not agree with their edits, and, if so, how did you deal with this?

I’d like to think I’m both open to feedback—that’s why you have an editor, after all!—and firm in my vision for my work. When my agent sent the book to publishers and I spoke with the editors who were interested, I was lucky to find someone who shared my vision but could also improve on it. I have to say that the publishing process has been incredibly smooth and positive. My editor and I are very simpatico, and if one of us feels strongly, the other typically understands and cedes to them.

 

Question #10

All of your readers are dying to know: what projects are you looking forward to working on next?

I’m working on another novel, though I’ve had to set it aside entirely in the past few weeks, as publicity ramps up for The Immortalists. I’ll be on tour throughout January (feel free to link to the tour schedule on my website!), but after I come back and sleep for a thousand hours, I’m excited to get back to it.

 

Where the Tables Turn: Feel free to ask me any question you’d like for me to answer for my readers, and/or pose a question to your readers or the general public!

There are more ways for bloggers, reviewers and readers to connect with authors these days, but I imagine that presents challenges when it comes to offering unbiased coverage. How do you juggle connecting with authors and writing honest reviews?

To answer Chloe’s question (other reviewers and bloggers, feel free to join in!): That’s a really great question. For me, writing reviews is about honesty, exploration and being 100% myself. I think—and I hope!—that that’s why my readers keep reading and following. I appreciate every author who takes the time from their busy lives to interact with me and the readers, while at the same time I think it’s important to give a fair review that is genuinely how I feel about the book. (Ironically, the only 1* review I’ve ever written is my most famous, with nearly 700 likes on Goodreads and counting—people love a good takedown.) Of the authors so far who are participating in this series (2 of which are not yet posted) I’ve given two 3* reviews, a 4* review and two 5* reviews. I’m just as excited to interview a 1* star-reviewed author as I am to interview a 5*-reviewed author, because it allows all readers to get to know that writer and their work—AND it allows me to ask questions that may clear up sour points in their novel for me.

Writing is an objective art. I don’t only write reviews; I’ve just completed my own novel and I’m working on a short story collection. I know that criticism can sting but that it can also add a new and dynamic POV that others had not thought to explore before. Being able to straddle that line allows me to juggle connecting with authors on a human level with writing honest reviews of their work. I would never embellish or mark down a review for likes or to get an author to work with me—BUT I do sometimes round stars up for novels that have a message I loved with a delivery I did not or some other incongruence such as that. For me, each rating is about the reading experience as a whole on an intellectual level. 🙂

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The Jekyll & Hyde & Various Sides of Writer Joy Lanzendorfer

To start the New Year of 2018 off with a BANG, if you’re looking for a dynamic writer you may not have encountered yet, look no further, for Joy Lanzendorfer is here! From short stories to blogging, photography to non-fiction articles, she shares her writing experiences with us here at The Navi Review. Oh, and don’t worry – she’s no Mr. Hyde, but you’ll love reading about her interest and experience with it!

Question # 1

You have written dozens of freelance articles for publications such as Mental Floss and The Atlantic, including many “facts you didn’t know about____” pieces. Where do you come up with the ideas for these pieces, and how do you know all of these fun facts?

I get ideas by noticing connections and asking questions. I find that when you follow your curiosity, one thing leads to another, and you end up making discoveries. For example, I became interested in Robert Louis Stevenson’s time in Napa, near where I live, because he honeymooned on a mountain that I’ve hiked before. In researching that, I learned that he stayed in a hotel in Monterey that still exists, so of course I had to visit that too. While there, I learned that he got the idea for Treasure Island from Monterey—while there, someone found Spanish coins on a beach and people speculated that pirates had put them there. I also learned how sick Stevenson was while in Monterey, and I started wondering how a man who died at age 44 from tuberculosis managed to accomplish so much in his life—he traveled much of the world and wrote a bunch of best-selling fiction. And THAT led to the discovery that he likely wrote Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde while on a cocaine binge. He was prescribed the drug and then wrote the novel in just a few days after he started taking it. Naturally I had to share all this with Mental Floss, which I did in my article 11 Strange Facts About Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (http://mentalfloss.com/article/67769/11-strange-facts-about-dr-jekyll-and-mr-hyde). So that’s an example of how I get ideas. Lots of curiosity, lots of research.

 

Question #2

You maintain a blog at www.ohjoy.org where you post everything from short stories to vacation photos to articles you’ve written for various publications. How has blogging helped you in your writing career, and what drives you to continue blogging?

It’s funny because I made my first website in 1996, and I’ve been online in some way since then, but it hasn’t helped my career at all until recently. I think the difference comes from building up social media, which I started doing about three years ago. Having more of a Twitter presence means that if followers are curious about me or read something I wrote, they’re more likely to go to the blog to see who I am. Sometimes that means they’ll reach out to me professionally. When I put up that I was looking for a literary agent, several agents saw it and emailed me, which never would have happened before I was on Twitter. I don’t think writers have to blog, but I do think it’s smart to have some kind of site with your bio and contact information. These days, people want to see who you are online.

Question # 3 

That would be “You’re A Good Man, Andy Hardy,” which was published in Hotel Amerika, and unfortunately isn’t online. It’s about the Andy Hardy movies of the 1930s, which starred Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland. The story is from the point of view of Betsy Booth, Judy Garland’s character, and it deals with gender inequality and traditional American ideas of what makes people “good” and “bad.” It’s the closest I’ve come to writing in the creative mode I’d ideally like to stay in, which is somewhat surreal and lyrical while still humorous. And the story gave me no hassle and came together easily, which makes me like it more.

Question #4

You seem to have a real passion for photography. Your blog features everything from nature photos to candid shots in everyday life. How did you develop your passion for photography, and how does this impact your writing?

Good question. I’ve never thought about this before. The short answer is that I’m just a creative person and I’m always making or recording or expressing something in some way. I cook and garden and sew and knit and all kinds of crap like that. I also come from a creative family. My grandfather was a photographer, my mom’s a painter, and my dad builds things out of wood, so it’s no surprise that I’m a visual thinker. Photography allows me to express my experience of a situation visually, and I like to share that experience with others. (My mom also makes oil paintings from the pictures I take, so I do a lot of it for her.) As for my writing, it’s useful to have a visual record of things I’ve experienced because I might want to describe something from it in the future.

 

Question #5

You’ve written and interviewed extensively on “The Rise of Plagiarism in Self-Publishing.” For those who haven’t read your work on this (which can be found at www.ohjoy.org), what circumstance have you personally encountered that has made you such a passionate voice about this?

I don’t think anything I’ve written has been plagiarized, although who knows? I’ve never looked. But I can’t imagine anything worse than someone taking your work and passing it off as their own, especially if it’s your creative writing. This may make me seem petty, but in school I hated when people copied me. I really couldn’t stand it if I did something original and someone else started doing it too. So I empathized with the writers in that article, especially since they had so little recourse for protecting their work.

 

Question #6

In your flash fiction such as “Murmur” and “Drought,” you pack social commentary into short reading doses. Do you find that it’s easier or more difficult to make an impact with flash fiction than with longer short stories or full-length fiction? What is your preferred medium of writing, and why?

I prefer novels. With novels, you have room to build worlds and develop characters, and the reader is more likely to go along with you. I think full-length short stories are the hardest things to write, period. They’re very finicky. They work best when the ending resonates, which means that writing them is a matter of setting out the exact components of a story—no more, no less—that lead to an earned ending that somehow equals all that came before. That’s hard to get right and it’s easy to think a short story is done when it’s not. Short-shorts are easier for me. They have to shift in some way to be a “story,” but that shift can be interpreted many ways, which means they’re more experimental. I like to experiment.

 

Question #7

What forms of writing have you not yet experimented with, and would you like to ever try writing in those forms? What makes those forms so different from the writing you do now?

I’m interested in playwriting. When I was in high school, I would go to the library, get out stacks of plays, and then read them, one after another. Because of this, the structure of a play is burned in my brain. I still read plays and keep up with current playwrights. Writing in all dialogue would come naturally to me, so maybe I’ll give it a try some day.

 

Question #8

Which of your stories is the first short story you ever had published in a literary magazine, and what was that experience like?

It was in college. It was a short story for a magazine called Straight Up!, or something silly like that. The story had to do with a glass swan, if I remember correctly. I probably have a copy up in the attic. It was a big deal to me because they paid me $80 for the story, which was the first time I was paid for something I wrote. At the time, I was debating whether or not to be a writer, and that story pushed me over toward writing, for better or worse.

 

Question #9

What is the strangest compliment you’ve ever received regarding your writing?

At a party recently, I ran into someone who was at a reading I gave 7-8 years ago. The story I read was about a creepy stalker with a glove fetish. Apparently my story freaked out this woman so much that she can’t look at gloves without thinking about it. She said I changed how she looks at gloves. Imagine that! It was one of the nicest compliments I’ve ever received.

 

Question #10

Tell us one awkward/embarrassing/unique fact about yourself.

 

I asked my friend what I should say here, and she reminded me of the weird things I do to myself when I’m writing. I’ll wrap myself in multiple blankets so not the slightest shift in air temperature can penetrate my skin, then I’ll put giant headphones on to block out noise, and then, if the light is bothering me, I’ll slap a sunhat on top of my head. I’ll look like a mummy with a crumpled sunhat on its head. It’s the most unsexy, silly way to write, but it helps me concentrate when I’m not distracted by bodily discomfort. It’s like putting blinders on a horse so it can concentrate on walking down the street.

 

Where the Tables Turn: Feel free to ask me any question you’d like for me to answer for my readers, and/or pose a question to your readers or the general public! 

 

What’s your favorite writing prompt? I like looking at the Post Secrets site for inspiration. (https://postsecret.com/)

 

To answer Joy’s question (readers, feel free to jump in and respond as well!) I tend to prefer prompts that push me outside of my comfort zone but not so far as to go completely to left field. For example, I love the prompt “Write about somebody who is COMPLETELY unlike yourself.” That’s how my short story “Kid Gloves” was written, from a prompt I was given years ago. However, if I was given a prompt like “Write about a Martian living on Mars” I’d be at a complete loss!

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